Course Overview

Attendance
UK/EU Fees £6,000 *
International Fees £7,250 *
Alumni Discount See details
Duration 2 years

* Price per academic year

Course summary

This course examines substance and procedure, order and disorder, uncertainty and risk, and justice and injustice in the public and private international and commercial spheres. It includes modules on negotiation, mediation and arbitration among many others, with a primary focus on the laws, customs, rules and practices, which are relevant to potential and actual conflicts and disputes. You will be able to take academic, practical and professional approaches to the issues, processes and skills in the field, including containment, management, negotiation, resolution and other processes. You will be able to mix with students on other Masters degree courses in the Westminster Law School.

The course gives you the opportunity for in-depth study of the substantive and procedural issues involved in the field. It is centrally concerned with law and other rules of international and commercial conduct in the context of prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes, including the relevance of democracy, regulation, governance, and international trade and investment law.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

You will be introduced to some of the essential elements of the fields of peaceful relations and conflict and dispute prevention and resolution. You will examine domestic, commercial, municipal, and international aspects of the fields, and the main processes and elements involved, including the concepts of peace, conflict, dispute, regulation, and risk. The module is designed to enable anyone to develop insights into the influences and pressures involved in decision-making in the contexts of prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes.

This module allows you to develop a knowledge and understanding by research of a specialist portion of the field of international and commercial dispute resolution law. You will have classes on the essential research and writing skills required for the dissertation, and you will also have the support of a supervisor for this independent research and writing work.

You must agree your specialist topic with the module leader. The topic must not replicate your own prior work or anyone else’s work. Your work for this module should provide you with advanced research skills, and advanced skills of analysis, evaluation, synthesis, application and writing, all of which should stand you in good stead for any subsequent academic, professional, practitioner, business, government, or other career.

Option modules

Arbitration:

You will be introduced to the study of comparative international commercial arbitration (excluding international arbitration between sovereign states and non-sovereign entities in the context of cross-border direct investment). You will examine the law and practice of international arbitration in the major arbitration centres of the world, and explore how different legal systems, and arbitrators from different legal cultures interact in the course of resolution of commercial disputes by arbitration.

This module introduces you to the study of public international arbitration between sovereign states and non-sovereign entities, such as companies, in the context of cross-border direct investment. You will examine the investment and disinvestment relationships between disputing parties (State and private) and the nature, function and interpretation of foreign investment instruments. You will also explore the relationship between international law and municipal investment laws, and tribunals and awards.

You will be introduced to the study of international commercial arbitration from the perspective of the English jurisdiction as an exemplar of an international centre for commercial arbitration. The aim is to include four pairs of overlapping relationships: between parties and tribunals; between parties and courts; between tribunals and courts; and between England and foreign fora. There will be focus, inter alia, on the ICC (institutional arbitration) and the New York Convention.

Comparative Law:

This module introduces you to the comparative study of different understandings and functions of laws and other norms within a variety of legal traditions. And you will be encouraged to see the ‘broader picture’ of the globalised commercial world through the theories of law transition. Within this framework, common law, civil law, Asian, and African legal families will be introduced. There will be special focus on current cases (e.g. in commercial arbitration and in litigation); and themes and legal problems which arise within comparative law will be critically analysed through the lens of legal traditions, legal families, and legal cultures.

Corporate Law:

This module provides a postgraduate introduction to the study of several facets of the global phenomenon of the multinational corporate entity and the foreign direct investment carried out by those cross-border corporate entities. The module includes the exploration of direct investment from home States into host States, and the treatment and regulation of multinational corporations –especially companies within such groups – by home and host States in the contexts of municipal law and international law. This includes, inter alia, claims by involuntary creditors, the role of creditor-proofing, and adjudication of disputes in municipal courts. The predominant focus is on the internal and external relationships of cross-border corporate groups in relation to their foreign direct investment activities.

Litigation:

The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate introduction to the field of international, national, public and private processes for the prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes.

Adjudication, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), and negotiation processes will be examined in the contexts of: international, municipal, public and private laws, rules, and other norms; international and municipal jurisdictions and applications of substantive laws; and the practices used in a variety of circumstances by natural and artificial persons, and organisations. Particular issues include: diplomacy, artificial intelligence, and parallel proceedings. And there will be insights into conflict and dispute prevention and resolution from legal anthropology and cyber relationships.

Mediation:

This module will introduce you to the development of the modes and culture of mediation as a dispute resolution process, in the context of both commercial and other disputes, with a detailed analysis of the anthropological growth of mediation practice, mediation theory and current and possible future trends. You will become familiar with the conceptual, legal and practical frameworks for mediation, identify the various forms in which mediation is used as a method of dispute resolution both in the UK and internationally, develop basic mediation skills, appreciate the roles of the various attendees and participants in mediation processes, and acquire communication and other skills particularly useful in the mediation context. In particular, the course will aim to equip you with a thorough appreciation of the different contexts in which mediation is now successfully applied, and current mediation practice across various legal, social and political spheres.

This module provides a postgraduate introduction to the field of restorative justice, covering international, domestic and public aspects of the field, and the main processes involved in restoration and integration within the field of dispute prevention and resolution. The module includes consideration of conflicts within and between groups (including cultural groups), and also victim-offender mediation and equivalent processes within the field. There will also be comparisons between restorative justice practices and other approaches to conflicts, including transitional justice.

Negotiation:

The aim of this module is to introduce the study and practice of negotiation in the contexts of international and municipal commerce, international affairs and international law, examining inter alia issues arising out of conflicts and disputes in those contexts. Among the areas covered are the relationships between pairs of negotiators; negotiators and the law; negotiators and ambient cultures; and theories and practices of negotiation.

Public International Law:

The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate introduction to the field of international, national, public and private processes for the prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes.

Adjudication, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), and negotiation processes will be examined in the contexts of: international, municipal, public and private laws, rules, and other norms; international and municipal jurisdictions and applications of substantive laws; and the practices used in a variety of circumstances by natural and artificial persons, and organisations. Particular issues include: diplomacy, artificial intelligence, and parallel proceedings. And there will be insights into conflict and dispute prevention and resolution from legal anthropology and cyber relationships.

You will be introduced to the various techniques and institutions available in international law for resolving disputes between states. The module examines diplomatic means of dispute settlement, including negotiation and mediation, and legal means of dispute settlement – arbitration and adjudication. You will also consider the availability of alternative mechanisms for the resolution of inter-state disputes, and the range of international courts and tribunals that now exist. The module refers to specific past and pending cases and disputes, and there is a special emphasis on the law, practice and procedure of the International Court of Justice.

The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate introduction to the field of peace processes before and after the onset of hostilities, and laws governing transitions from peace to conflict and from conflict to peace.   The module explores the role of individuals and groups in the maintenance of peace within and between States and the psychological and other pressures on individuals and groups; the processes involved in bringing an end to hostilities, and the role of peacemakers, peacebuilders, and State builders; the role of criminals and other ‘spoilers’ in the descent from peace and in the return to peaceful conditions; the nature of ceasefire and subsequent agreements between hostile parties, and laws applicable to those agreements; the short-term and long-term effectiveness of peace agreements and peaceful conditions; and the role of opinion formers in support of peace and peace processes.

Entry Requirements

Typical offer

You should have a good Honours degree in Law or any non-Law subject from a UK university, or the equivalent from a non-UK university, and satisfactory references.

Other qualifications or experiential routes can sometimes be agreed.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 overall, with 6.0 in each component, or equivalent.

View more information about our entry requirements and the application process.

Typical offer

You should have a good Honours degree in Law or any non-Law subject from a UK university, or the equivalent from a non-UK university, and satisfactory references.

Other qualifications or experiential routes can sometimes be agreed.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 overall, with 6.0 in each component, or equivalent.

More information

Careers

This course is designed to benefit a wide range of individuals, including graduates progressing towards PhD programmes; practising lawyers; other practitioners such as arbitrators, civil servants, diplomats, insurers, journalists, judges, linguists and mediators; and commercial directors and managers.

The course is ideal for anyone with a gap year between career stages, and for anyone from the European Union and other countries wanting to improve their English for career purposes.

Our Careers and Employability Service is here to support you to achieve your full potential.
 
With a growing network of over 3,000 employers around the world and a team of experienced careers consultants, we provide you with a variety of opportunities to work and develop new skills. As a University of Westminster student, you’ll have access to our services throughout your studies and after you graduate.
 
We can help you:
    •    find work placements, graduate jobs or voluntary experience related to your course
    •    discover international opportunities to enhance your employability
    •    write effective CVs and application forms
    •    develop your interview and enterprise skills
    •    plan your career with our career consultants
    •    gain insights into your chosen industry through mentoring
    •    meet employers and explore your career options at our employer fairs, careers presentations and networking events 
 
Find out more about the Careers and Employability Service.

 

Find out more about other employability initiatives at the University of Westminster. 

Find out more

Postgraduate Law Courses at Westminster Law School

Fees and Funding

UK and EU tuition fee: £6,000 (Price per academic year)

When you have enrolled with us, your annual tuition fees will remain the same throughout your studies with us. We do not increase your tuition fees each year.

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

As well as tuition fee loans, there is a range of funding available to help you fund your studies.

Find out about postgraduate student funding options.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

International tuition fee: £7,250 (Price per academic year)

When you have enrolled with us, your annual tuition fees will remain the same throughout your studies with us. We do not increase your tuition fees each year.

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

Find out about funding for international students.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

Course Location

Westminster Law School resides at Little Titchfield Street, part of our Regent Campus. Alongside a full mock courtroom, hi-tech learning spaces and a pro-bono clinic, it also houses our state-of-the-art, 382-seat lecture theatre. For more details, visit our Little Titchfield Street page.

Contact us

Contact the Course Enquiries Team:

+44 (0)20 7915 5511

[email protected]

Opening hours (GMT): 9am–4.30pm Monday to Friday

More information

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