Dr Bradley Elliott

Lecturer

+44 20 7911 5000 ext 64582
115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW

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Biomedical Sciences | Department

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I studied for a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at the University of Auckland, New Zealand before completing a Master of Science (Experimental Medicine) at Université Laval, Canada. My doctorate was done here at the University of Westminster where I worked on human and applied physiology, examining myostatin regulation during acute hypoxic insult in healthy humans, as a model of chronic disorders. During the course of my doctorate I have also had the chance to complete a Post Graduate Certificate in Teaching & Learning, and am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

I teach physiology across undergraduate and graduate programmes, as well as maintaining an active research programme into muscle atrophy, frailty and aging. I also lead the Translational Physiology Research Group, who's remit is translation of in vitro into the human in vivo to better understand human function. 

I also engage in wider scientific communication where possible, appearing on documentaries for the BBC, Channel 4, ITV and in print media. In 2016 I provided technical assistance in the production of the Royal Institution's Christmas Lecture

Physiological Society

2015
Travel Grant - £700

Internal Research Support

2015
Aging & Myostatin pilot study - £3 770

Society for Endocrinology

2016
Role of endocrine myostatin in the regulation of human muscle mass with aging - £9 457

Qunitin Hogg

2017
Use of Hypoxia for modulation of metabolism in type II Diabetes - £38 196

Doctor of Philosophy (Physiology)

2010 - 2015
University of Westminster, London, UK

Post-Graduate Certificate (Student :Learning)

2011 - 2012
University of Westminster, London, UK Examiners commendations

Master of Science (Experimental Medicine)

2007 - 2009
Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada

Bachelor of Science (Sport & Exercise Science)

2003 - 2006
First class honours, University of Auckland, New Zealand

My primary teaching role is in physiology. I lead the Faculty's largest module (level 4 Human Physiology), as well as contributing to physiology modules across all levels of the undergraduate and post-graduate curriculum. Besides this core area, I contribute to ethics and science communication. I also supervise student research at the graduate and post-graduate level, with my students working in areas that are closely aligned with my research interests (aging, hypoxia and the regulation of muscle size). 

My research can be described as translational physiology and examines the effect of atrophic stimuli upon muscle size both in vitro and in vivo, with particular focus on the regulation of cell size and the role of myostatin signalling in this process. In vitro, I use the C2C12 mouse myoblast line, perturbed with atrophic or hypertrophic stimuli, before examining changes in cell size by microscopy and alterations in cellular signalling pathways by Western blot. In vivo healthy humans are exposed to stimuli such as disuse, hypoxia or resistance training, with blood and muscle tissue collected for analysis. By understanding the basic science of how muscle is gained and lost when homeostasis is challenged, I aim to uncover the mechanisms underlying atrophy of muscle during disease and aging, and ultimately prevent them.

I also have a secondary research focus on the integration of modern digital tools (tablets, wearables and smartphones) into physiology teaching and research. 

2017

High intensity exercise decreases IP6K1 muscle content & improves insulin sensitivity in glucose intolerant individuals (2017)
Naufahu, J., Elliott, B., Markiv, A., Dunning-Foreman, P., McGrady, M., Howard, D., Watt, P.W. and Mackenzie, R.W.A. 2017. High intensity exercise decreases IP6K1 muscle content & improves insulin sensitivity in glucose intolerant individuals. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
Lifelong exercise, but not short-term high-intensity interval training, increases GDF11, a marker of successful aging: a preliminary investigation (2017)
Elliott, B., Herbert, P., Sculthorpe, N., Grace, F., Stratton, D. and Hayes, L. 2017. Lifelong exercise, but not short-term high-intensity interval training, increases GDF11, a marker of successful aging: a preliminary investigation. Physiological Report. 5 (13), p. e13343.

2016

Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 days (2016)
Elliott, B., Mina, A. and Ferrier, C. 2016. Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 days. Clinical Medical Insights: Case Reports. 2016:9, pp. 67-70.

2015

Wearable technology in academia: the use of Google Glass in the life sciences (2015)
Elliott, B. and Sukan, A. 2015. Wearable technology in academia: the use of Google Glass in the life sciences. Compass: Journal of Learning & Teaching . 6 (10).

2014

Akt/PKB activation and insulin signaling: a novel insulin signaling pathway in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (2014)
MacKenzie, R., Elliot, B. and Elliott, B. 2014. Akt/PKB activation and insulin signaling: a novel insulin signaling pathway in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. 2014 (7), pp. 55-64.

2012

The effect of hypoxia and work intensity on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (2012)
MacKenzie, R., Elliott, B., Maxwell, N.S., Brickley, G. and Watt, P.W. 2012. The effect of hypoxia and work intensity on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 97 (1), pp. 155-62.
Intermittent Exercise with and without Hypoxia Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes (2012)
MacKenzie, R., Maxwell, N.S., Castle, P.C., Elliot, B., Brickley, G., Watt, P.W. and Elliott, B. 2012. Intermittent Exercise with and without Hypoxia Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 97 (4), pp. 46-55.
The Central Role of Myostatin in Skeletal Muscle and Whole Body Homeostasis (2012)
Elliott, B., Renshaw, D., Getting, S.J. and MacKenzie, R. 2012. The Central Role of Myostatin in Skeletal Muscle and Whole Body Homeostasis. Acta Physiologica. 205 (3), pp. 324-40.

2008

Voluntary resistance running wheel activity pattern and skeletal muscle growth in rats (2008)
Legerlotz, K., Elliott, B., Guillemin, B. and Smith, H. 2008. Voluntary resistance running wheel activity pattern and skeletal muscle growth in rats. Experimental Physiology. 93 (6), pp. 754-62.

2017

PhytoCloud: A gamified Mobile Web Application to modulate diet and physical activity of women with breast cancer (2017)
Economou, D., Dwek, M., Elliott, B., Ramezanian Kalahroudi, M. and Azimi, T. 2017. PhytoCloud: A gamified Mobile Web Application to modulate diet and physical activity of women with breast cancer. IEEE 30th International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems. Thessaloniki, Greece 22 Jun 2017 to end of 24 Sep 2017 IEEE .

2016

Circulating myostatin is reduced with aging in humans but not altered by short-term, high intensity training (2016)
Elliott, B., Shinwari, Z.B., Altayar, Z., Barrios, L., Chaudhary, G.A., Hanifa, E., Parnell, M., Xenofontos, T., Sculthorpe, N., Herbert, P., Grace, F. and Hayes, L. 2016. Circulating myostatin is reduced with aging in humans but not altered by short-term, high intensity training. Physiology 2016. Dublin, Ireland 29 Jul 2016 to end of 31 Jul 2017 The Physiological Society.

2015

Acute hypoxia reduces plasma myostatin independent of hypoxic dose (2015)
Elliott, B., Simonson, T.S., Getting, S.J., Renshaw, D., Wagner Peter, D. and MacKenzie, R. 2015. Acute hypoxia reduces plasma myostatin independent of hypoxic dose. 8th International Conference on Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle Wasting. Paris 04 to end of 06 Dec 2015 The Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

2014

Acute hypoxia alters myotube size in vitro and myostatin signalling in vivo (2014)
Elliott, B., Renshaw, D., Getting, S.J., Watt, P.W. and MacKenzie, R. 2014. Acute hypoxia alters myotube size in vitro and myostatin signalling in vivo. FASEB. San Diego Jul 2015 Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.
The role of acute hypoxia in skeletal muscle atrophy (2014)
Elliott, B., Renshaw, D., Getting, S.J., Watt, P., Howard, D. and MacKenzie, R. 2014. The role of acute hypoxia in skeletal muscle atrophy. Physiology. London 30 Jun 2014 The Physiological Society.

2015

The role of acute ambient hypoxia in the regulation of myostatin (2015)
Elliott, B. 2015. The role of acute ambient hypoxia in the regulation of myostatin. PhD thesis University of Westminster Biomedical Sciences

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