Dr Haiko Ballieux

Course Leader BSc Cognitive & Clinical Neuroscience

+44 20 7911 5000 ext 64876
115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW
Thursdays 2-3pm, and by email appointment

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I finished an MSc in Developmental and Experimental Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, and an MSc in Cognitive Science at the Cognitive Science Centre Amsterdam (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies).

In 2006, I moved to London for a Marie Curie PhD Fellowship at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development (CBCD) at Birkbeck College (under supervision of Denis Mareschal), where I used both eye-tracking and behavioural measures to investigate infant object perception, action perception and action production/imitation.

After finishing my PhD in 2010 I worked both as a researcher and a lecturer at the University of East London (UEL). In September 2013 I moved to the University of Westminster where I work as a Senior Lecturer in Developmental Psychology and have recently become Course Leader for the BSc Cognitive & Clinical Neuroscience.

At Birkbeck College I was a Seminar Group Leader on the Critical Analysis Course, as well as a Demonstrator on the Research Methods Course, and at UEL I have worked as a Lecturer in Developmental Psychology. 

At the University of Westminster  I am module leader of the Level 6 module 'Advanced Developmental Psychology' and the Level 5 module 'Lifespan Development', and have recently been awarded Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA). I further teach on modules such as 'Developmental Psychology' (Level 4), 'Lifespan Development' (Level 5), the interdisciplinary 'Art/Science Collaboration' module (Level 5), 'Evolution of Language, Communication, and Consciousness' (Level 6), 'Psychology of Education' (Level 6), 'Developmental & Differential Psychology' (MSc), 'Fundamentals of Psychology' (MSc), and 'Quantitative Research Methods' (MSc).

At the CBCD Babylab I used both eye-tracking and behavioural measures to investigate infant object perception, action perception and action production/imitation. At UEL I worked on a 3-year longitudinal research project (funded by the Nuffield Foundation) where I took eye-tracking equipment into Sure Start Children's Centres in East London, investigating the potential impact of socio-economic status (SES) and language background on the early development of social communication and language skills in infants.

I also ran another Nuffield Foundation funded pilot project, delivering gaze-contingency attention control training to infants, again using eye tracking technology in community centres (the gaze-contingency paradigm was developed by Dr Sam Wass). This pilot study was recently published in the Journal for Applied Developmental Psychology (see outputs).

Here at UoW I am currently setting up an eye-tracking unit for infant studies, and will start supervising a PhD student from Sep 2017 who will investigate the effects of mindfulness meditation and yoga on young teenagers at school.

2016

Separating the effects of ethnicity and socio-economic status on sleep practices of 6- to 7-month-old infants (2016)
Tomalski, P., Moore, D.G., Ballieux, H., Kushnerenko, E., Johnson, M.H. and Karmiloff-Smith, A. 2016. Separating the effects of ethnicity and socio-economic status on sleep practices of 6- to 7-month-old infants. Learning & Individual Differences. 46, pp. 64-69.
Applying gaze-contingent training within community settings to infants from diverse SES backgrounds (2016)
Ballieux, H., Wass, S., Tomalski, P., Kushnerenko, E., Karmiloff-Smith, A., Johnson, M.H. and Moore, D.G. 2016. Applying gaze-contingent training within community settings to infants from diverse SES backgrounds. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology. 43, pp. 8-17.
Feasibility of undertaking off-site infant eye-tracking assessments of neuro-cognitive functioning in early-intervention centres (2016)
Ballieux, H., Haiko, Tomalski, P., Kushnerenko, E., Johnson, M.H., Karmiloff-Smith, A. and Moore, D.G. 2016. Feasibility of undertaking off-site infant eye-tracking assessments of neuro-cognitive functioning in early-intervention centres . Infant and Child Development. 25 (1), pp. 95-113.

2013

Brain responses to audiovisual speech mismatch in infants are associated with individual differences in looking behaviour (2013)
Kushnerenko, E., Tomalski, P., Ballieux, H., Ribeiro, H., Potton, A., Axelsson, E.L., Murphy, E. and Moore, D.G. 2013. Brain responses to audiovisual speech mismatch in infants are associated with individual differences in looking behaviour. European Journal of Neuroscience. 38 (9), pp. 3363-3369.
Exploring early developmental changes in face scanning patterns during the perception of audiovisual mismatch of speech cues (2013)
Tomalski, P., Ribeiro, H., Ballieux, H., Axelsson, E.L., Murphy, E., Moore, D.G. and Kushnerenko, E. 2013. Exploring early developmental changes in face scanning patterns during the perception of audiovisual mismatch of speech cues. European Journal of Developmental Psychology. 10 (5), pp. 611-624.
Brain responses and looking behavior during audiovisual speech integration in infants predict auditory speech comprehension in the second year of life (2013)
Kushnerenko, E., Tomalski, P., Ballieux, H., Potton, A., Birtles, D., Frostick, C. and Moore, D.G. 2013. Brain responses and looking behavior during audiovisual speech integration in infants predict auditory speech comprehension in the second year of life. Frontiers in Psychology. 4, p. 432.
Water consumption, not expectancies about water consumption, affects cognitive performance in adults (2013)
Edmonds, C.J., Crombie, R., Ballieux, H., Gardner, M. and Dawkins, L. 2013. Water consumption, not expectancies about water consumption, affects cognitive performance in adults. Appetite. 60, pp. 148-153.

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