Dr Catherine Loveday, neuropsychologist and Principal Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Westminster’s Faculty of Science and Technology, discusses the dramatic impact musical training can have on enhancing memory.

“Music probably does something unique,” explains neuropsychologist Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster. “It stimulates the brain in a very powerful way, because of our emotional connection with it.”

“Music reaches parts of the brain that other things can’t,” says Loveday. “It’s a strong cognitive stimulus that grows the brain in a way that nothing else does, and the evidence that musical training enhances things like working memory and language is very robust.”

Learning to play a musical instrument, then, seems to be one of the most effective forms of brain training there is. Musical training can induce various structural and functional changes in the brain, depending on which instrument is being learned, and the intensity of the training regime. It’s an example of how dramatically life-long experience can alter the brain so that it becomes adapted to the idiosyncrasies of its owner’s lifestyle.

Read the full article on the Guardian

Press and media enquiries

Contact us on:

+44 (0)20 3506 9464 (9am-5pm Monday to Friday)
+44 (0)7970 483 778

[email protected]