Dr Colin Gleeson, Principal Lecturer in the Department of Property and Construction in the University’s Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, has been a joint author of a recently published data analysis of heat pump installations from the Renewable Heat Premium Payment (RHPP) scheme.

The report, on behalf of the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), was produced in collaboration with University College London, the Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA) and the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.

The aim of the report is to analyse the performance of RHPP heat pump installations under standard, British weather conditions and to provide expected energy and carbon dioxide savings from using these heat pumps, as opposed to using other fuels.

Explaining the research, Dr Gleeson said: “Dwellings are responsible for approximately 30 per cent of EU greenhouse gas end-use emissions. EU climate change mitigation policies are driving a transition from fossil fuel and electrical resistance heating systems to low and zero carbon alternatives that include heat pumps as a source of renewable heat.

“The research investigates the in-situ performance of 700 heat pumps installed under the RHPP scheme, the precursor to the current Renewable Heat Incentive. Heat pumps extract heat from the outside air or the ground through vapour compression, like a refrigerator. The ratio of extracted heat to electrical power is therefore critical to their classification as a renewable technology.

“The research investigates the potential of heat pumps to transform central heating systems from emitters of greenhouse gases to providers of renewable heat.”

Read the DECC report.

Find out more about the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment.

Dr Gleeson is a joint author of recently published reports on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS): Detailed analysis of data from heat pumps installed via the Renewable Heat Premium Payment Scheme (RHPP).

The five reports were coproduced with UCL Energy Institute, Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA) and SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.

Explaining the research, Dr Gleeson said: “Dwellings are responsible for approximately 30 per cent of EU greenhouse gas end-use emissions. EU climate change mitigation policies are driving a transition from fossil fuel and electrical resistance heating systems to low and zero carbon forms of renewable heat such as heat pumps. The research investigates the in-situ performance of 700 heat pumps installed under the RHPP scheme, the precursor to the current Renewable Heat Incentive”.

The reports are available on the Gov.uk website.

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