On Thursday 24 May, Dr Faith Gordon launched her new book entitled 'Children, Young People and the Press in a Transitioning Society: Representations, Reactions and Criminalisation’.

The event, opened by Criminology Course Leader David Manlow, included panel discussions and presentations from keynote speakers including Ebinehita Iyere, Youth Engagement Coordinator at Peer Power UK, Professor Lisa Webley, Chair in Legal Education and Research, Birmingham Law School,  Penelope Gibbs, Transform Justice & Deputy Chair of the Standing Committee for Youth Justice, Jack Rowlands, Inspector Brixton Police Custody & Trustee of Wave Trust, May Bulman, Social Affairs Correspondent at The Independent as well as Holly Powell-Jones, Deputy-Director of the Youth Justice Network, who presented a call to action session during the event. 

The panel session, entitled ‘Perspective on Youth Violence in London: Realities, Representations and Rhetoric’, was followed by engaging discussions and many questions from the audience and twitter feed.

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Dr Faith Gordon, Lecturer in Criminology and Director of the Youth Justice Network, also addressed key messages from her new book exploring the implications of children and young people’s representation in print media in Northern Ireland.

The book analyses how children and young people’s perceived involvement in anti-social and criminal behaviour is constructed and amplified in media, as well as in popular and political discourses.

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The event was a success with a great turnout of participants from NGO’s, MET Police, Youth Justice policy sectors as well as lawyers, youth mentor coordinators, journalists and academics from other institutions.

Talking about the event, Dr Faith Gordon said: “I would like to sincerely thank all of those who attended and supported this event. The monograph that was launched is derived in over a decade’s worth of research into the media’s representation of children and young people in a post-conflict transitioning society. 

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Graphic facilitation by @MendoncaPen - www.penmendonca.com
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“As demonstrated, core issues such as the demonisation and vilification of youth, journalists accessing and reprinting contents and imagery from children and young people’s social media, as well as the marginalised and hidden nature of the voices of children, young people and their advocates, are common themes also present in the discussions we had about the portrayal of youth involvement in violence. 

“At the event, I stated that unfortunately children and young people continue to be targeted, scapegoated, demonised and blamed for a range of social problems. We need to ask ourselves and our politicians why. We all have a responsibility to bring about change.”

Read more about the book and reviews on palgrave.com. 

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