Course Overview

Attendance
UK/EU Fees £4,500 *
International Fees £6,500 *
Alumni Discount See details
Duration 2 years

* Price per academic year

Course summary

This course embraces a wide range of public, private and domestic issues relevant to peaceful relations and the prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes, including the roles of laws, decisions, risks and justice. The course includes (but is not restricted to) negotiation and arbitration, and also the alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes such as mediation and conciliation.

The course combines academic and practical approaches to teaching and learning.  Class sizes are, in general, quite small allowing for an interactive approach to learning.  You will be able to mix with students on other Master’s courses at Westminster Law School.

It aims to provide an opportunity for in-depth study of the issues and the practices involved in the fields of peace, conflict prevention and dispute resolution, including the mechanisms of prevention, emergence, avoidance, management, resolution and regulation.

In addition to taught modules, there is also the Dissertation module which provides an opportunity for developing a specialist knowledge of a small area of the field, which might lead to a publishable article.

The course content is not explicitly concerned with 'peace studies', but the processes of prevention and the processes of resolution embrace the concepts of securing and maintaining peaceful cooperation.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

You will be introduced to some of the essential elements of the fields of peaceful relations and conflict and dispute prevention and resolution. You will examine domestic, commercial, municipal, and international aspects of the fields, and the main processes and elements involved, including the concepts of peace, conflict, dispute, regulation, and risk. The module is designed to enable anyone to develop insights into the influences and pressures involved in decision-making in the contexts of prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes.

This module allows you to develop a knowledge and understanding by research of a specialist portion of the fields of peaceful relations, and conflict and dispute prevention and resolution. You will have classes on the essential research and writing skills required for the dissertation, and you will also have the support of a supervisor for this independent research and writing work.

You must agree your specialist topic with the module leader. The topic must not replicate your own prior work or anyone else’s work. Your work for this module should provide you with advanced research skills, and advanced skills of analysis, evaluation, synthesis, application and writing, all of which should stand you in good stead for any subsequent academic, professional, practitioner, business, government, or other career.

Option modules

In this module you will develop a postgraduate knowledge and understanding of international developments in cross-national and trans-national crime control, their relationship to globalisation, and their implications for the discipline of criminology. The two broad areas of investigation are (a) comparative criminal justice, which compares crime control practices (such as urban security, policing and the use of prisons) between different countries and regions, and (b) transnational justice, which studies policing and judicial systems and networks that cross borders (for instance, in response to international terrorism and drug trafficking).

There will be a number of comparative and case study analyses of security, policing and punishment in national, regional and transnational context.

This module introduces you to the modes and culture of mediation as a dispute resolution process in a range of contexts, with a detailed analysis of the growth of mediation practice and theory as well as current and possible future trends. You will become familiar with the conceptual, legal and practical frameworks of mediation, and how it is used in the UK and internationally. You will also develop basic mediation skills, learn to appreciate the roles of those taking part in the mediation processes, and acquire communication and other skills which are particularly useful in the mediation context.

The aim of this module is to introduce the study and practice of negotiation in the contexts of international and municipal commerce, and international affairs and international law, examining inter alia issues arising out of conflicts and disputes in those contexts. Among the areas covered are the relationships between pairs of negotiators; negotiators and the law; negotiators and ambient cultures; and theories and practices of negotiation.

In this module you will examine the variety of processes involved in the development and maintenance of peaceful relationships between members of societies, including the pluralistic nature of peaceful conditions within and between sovereign States; and you will develop an understanding of the conditional nature of peace as a combination of processes within and between a variety of parties. There will be an interdisciplinary approach to the nature of peace; the creation of the conditions for peace; peacekeeping; peacebuilding; and managing the peace in a variety of settings, including international, municipal, and domestic settings.

This module provides a postgraduate introduction to the field of restorative justice, covering international, domestic and public aspects of the field, and the main processes involved in restoration and integration within the field of dispute prevention and resolution. The module includes consideration of conflicts within and between groups (including cultural groups), and also victim-offender mediation and equivalent processes within the field. There will also be comparisons between restorative justice practices and other approaches to conflicts, including transitional justice.

In this module you will be introduced to State crime in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with some reference to earlier centuries. States have been responsible for some of the most heinous acts of social harm occurring within their own territories. You will examine the structural conditions that give rise to State crime and the legal, political and economic barriers that prevent the prosecution of State crime.

You will explore the types of government influences which lead to the manifestation of State crime, and also the relationship between war and conflict on the one hand and State crime on the other. The module will use cases studies throughout to demonstrate these issues, including Argentina’s Dirty War, the Rwandan genocide and contemporary police practices in Brazil. The module will also give you the analytical tools to explore ethical issues within the field of transitional justice.

Elective modules

Students taking this course are permitted to choose an Elective module instead of one of the Option modules. Elective modules include: International Commercial Arbitration; and Comparative Law. But students taking this course are not allowed to take the Processes and Norms in Prevention and Resolution module.

Westminster Plus Electives

 
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As part of your course you may be able to take elective modules. Electives are an exciting opportunity to widen your experience at university and to gain skills and knowledge that will help make you more employable.

Find out about Westminster Plus Electives.

Entry Requirements

Typical offer

You are expected to have a good UK Honours degree in Law or a non-Law subject (such as – but not limited to – Politics, Psychology, and Management) or the equivalent from a non-UK university, and satisfactory references. Other qualifications or experiential routes can sometimes be agreed.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5, or the equivalent standard in an acceptable alternative test. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course.

View more information about our entry requirements and the application process.

Typical offer

You are expected to have a good UK Honours degree in Law or a non-Law subject (such as – but not limited to – Politics, Psychology, and Management) or the equivalent from a non-UK university, and satisfactory references. Other qualifications or experiential routes can sometimes be agreed.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5, or the equivalent standard in an acceptable alternative test. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course.

More information

Careers

This course is designed to benefit a wide range of individuals, including graduates progressing towards a PhD programme, practising lawyers wanting to further their knowledge and skills, other graduates and practitioners (such as arbitrators, civil servants, insurers, journalists, judges, linguists and mediators), and anyone managing people and risks.

The course is also ideal if you are on a gap year between career stages, and for those from the European Union and other countries who want to improve their English for personal and career purposes.

Westminster law students benefit from the following:

  • Dedicated 1-2-1 appointments with careers advisors.
  • Feedback and advice on CVs, applications and interview preparation.
  • Employer panel events and talks.
  • Law vacancy jobs bulletin.
  • Annual Law Fair Consortium.
  • Mock Assessment Centres and Interviews.

Our Career Development Centre has just been shortlisted for the Best University Careers Service in the National Undergraduate Employability Awards for 2017.

With a growing network of over 3,000 employers around the world and a team of experienced careers consultants, we are here to help you succeed.

In 2015–16, we helped over 1,500 students find work placements across a range of sectors, with 250 employers attending 14 on-campus skills and careers fairs.

As a Westminster student, you’ll have access to our services throughout your studies and after you graduate.

We can help you:

  • find work placements related to your course
  • find part-time/vacation, placement and graduate jobs, including voluntary experience
  • find international opportunities to enhance your employability
  • market yourself effectively to employers
  • write better CVs and application forms
  • develop your interview and enterprise skills
  • plan your career with our careers consultants
  • meet employers and explore your career options at our employer fairs, careers presentations and networking events throughout the year

Find out more about the Career Development Centre.

Find out more

Postgraduate Law Courses at Westminster Law School

Fees and Funding

UK and EU tuition fee: £4,500 (Price per academic year)

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

As well as tuition fee loans, there is a range of funding available to help you fund your studies.

Find out about postgraduate student funding options.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

International tuition fee: £6,500 (Price per academic year)

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

Find out about funding for international students.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

Course Location

Westminster Law School resides at Little Titchfield Street, part of our Regent Campus. Alongside a full mock courtroom, hi-tech learning spaces and a pro-bono clinic, it also houses our state-of-the-art, 382-seat lecture theatre. For more details, visit our Little Titchfield Street page.

Contact us

Call our dedicated team on:

+44 (0)20 7915 5511

Opening hours (GMT): 9am-5pm Monday to Friday

[email protected]

More information

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