Doctoral Researchers

Denise Kwan is a doctoral researcher at the Modern Languages and Cultures Department, University of Westminster. Her research is concerned with the in/visibility of British Chinese identities in the context of multicultural Britain. Denise is interested in the relationship between cultural memory and objects and, furthermore, the potential of objects to reform fixed notions of cultural representation. Her research aims to bridge the areas of migration studies and art. With a background in art, Denise has worked on the curatorial department at BALTIC, Gateshead and curated exhibitions at Zabuldowicz Gallery as well as ACME gallery, London. Denise has written for national art magazines including Art Review and has been awarded art writing prizes from the Centre of Contemporary Chinese Art, Manchester (2014) and the BREESELITTLE Art Criticism Prize (2010).

Benedetta Morsiani is a doctoral researcher at the University of Westminster, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. Her research interests include African diaspora, identity and cultural/anthropological studies. Her PhD project focuses on the Congolese community in London. It investigates how the second and third generation members of the community have transformed/adapted their multiple identities; how they re-think and re-construct a sense of attachment to their place of origin and place of residence, with a particular focus on cultural expressions. She received a BA Honours in Oriental History, Cultures and Civilization from the University of Bologna in Italy, and a double MA Honours in African Studies from the University of Bologna and Dalarna University in Sweden, with a dissertation on identity construction among young Eritreans living in Bologna.

Giulia Pepe is a doctoral researcher at the University of Westminster's Department of English Linguistics and Cultural Studies. Her research focuses on the language spoken by young Italians who migrated to London after the 2007 economic crisis. She investigates the social characteristics of this migratory flow, comparing it with other phases of Italian diaspora. She is developing a new corpus of data (spontaneous recorded conversations) to investigate distinctive linguistic phenomena realised by young Italian migrants. Giulia has had an interest in language and its connection with sociology since her BA. She graduated in Italian Literature and Modern Humanities at Università degli Studi di Milano, with a dissertation on the use of swearing in Italian political speeches (2012). She post-graduated in English Linguistics at the University of Westminster with a thesis on the role of bad language in British society.

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