Course Overview

Attendance
UK/EU Fees £2,750 *
International Fees £6,250 *
Alumni Discount See details
Duration 2 years

* Price per academic year

Course summary

The English Literature: Modern and Contemporary Fictions MA gives you the chance to study English literature in a modern university environment, while taking advantage of the wealth of resources offered by London's rich cultural life. You will examine literary texts in the wider context of cultural production and relate them to the social, historical and political circumstances from which they emerge.

The course team consists of academic specialists who make use of the many nearby museums, galleries and libraries in their teaching. The course will be of particular interest to those wishing to prepare for further study at MPhil or PhD level, and those teaching English who want to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field.

This course is designed to offer a coherent programme of postgraduate study that allows for both chronological range and specific topical focus. It gives you the opportunity to revisit and reinvestigate the texts, critical practices, institutions and periods that make up the discipline in order to see it in new and exciting ways.

It consists of three core modules. Subjectivities constructs a critical sense of the discipline by focusing on the notion of subjectivity. It investigates the idea of a self as relevant to questions of literary form, to reading, and to writing. Institutions and Histories looks at the institutional and material conditions that produce our ideas of what literature is and the way literary texts are determined by them. Topics covered include the institution of publishing, questions of history, and globalisation, and a critical investigation of the premises and assumptions of academic study. The Dissertation, which can be written on an appropriate topic of your choice, is also a core module. The option modules provide an opportunity for you to deepen and extend your knowledge of a range of periods, issues and forms across the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

You will choose four modules from the option modules listed below.

Core modules

This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision.

The module is designed to support and develop your independent research skills.

The module examines a range of topics at the heart of writing in the 20th and 21st centuries and of literary studies itself. You will examine a range of topics, including: genre and history; literature’s contemporary globalisation; the historical development of English Literature as a discipline; the history and theorisation of the notion ‘literature’ itself; and the material cultures of literary production and consumption.

This module investigates the basis of the literary and of literary studies via the idea of the subject. As a part of this, you will explore different critical approaches, such as feminism and post-colonialism, as well as looking at key issues in literary studies such as the roles of the author and the reader. An independent module, it is also designed to give you the opportunity for preparatory discussion of topics in optional modules.

Option modules

This module explores innovations by women through the 20th and 21st centuries in the areas of writing, film and photography. Through paying close attention to their experimental practices, it will explore questions of gender and sexuality in relation to the formal conventions of, among others, narrative, voice, montage, mimesis and the intertextual. In particular, it will explore how a range of women artists over the period have experimented by moving between and combining writing, film and photography.

This module focuses on the literature and art of the first half of the twentieth century produced in and engaging with London. It considers how the city shaped the writing and visual art of the period, and in so doing investigates the idea of modernism, its debates, its meaning and its boundaries.

This module examines the idea of British literary culture since the 1990s. By focusing particularly on the relationships between writing and film, and writing and the visual arts, the module investigates the state and status of literary writing during this period. Authors studied include A. S. Byatt, Sarah Kane, Zadie Smith, Irvine Welsh, Ian McEwan and Stewart Home.

This interdisciplinary module explores the emergence of American trauma culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Drawing upon key literary, cultural, and critical texts, the course interrogates the ways in which evolving conceptions of trauma are inherently related to the changing conditions of historical modernity, informed by processes of industrialisation, technologisation, militarisation, and securitisation.

Seminars will highlight the paradoxes and inconsistencies inherent to various trauma paradigms, examining the ambiguous relations they construct between individuals and collectives, internal and external borders, mind and body, past and present, private and public life.

Using a range of theoretical, historical, literary, cinematic, visual and other cultural texts, you will explore the idea of urban culture as it has developed since the mid-19th century. The module considers a variety of different representations of the city, and the ways in which they understand the specificity of urban experience itself. You will also explore the changing global forms and interrelations of ‘western’ and ‘non-western’ urban forms. 

This module offers students a chance to spend time in a working environment and to think critically about the issues raised by their time there. In the past students have gained work placement places in schools, galleries, publishing companies and translation agencies, among others.

Entry Requirements

Typical offer

You should have a good Honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or equivalent) in a relevant subject area.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of at least 6.5 with 7.0 in writing (or equivalent).

Applicants may also be asked to provide an example of previous written work as part of the application. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course.

View more information about our entry requirements and the application process.

Typical offer

You should have a good Honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or equivalent) in a relevant subject area.

If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of at least 6.5 with 7.0 in writing (or equivalent).

Applicants may also be asked to provide an example of previous written work as part of the application. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course.

More information

Careers

An MA in English Literature provides students with skills in researching, writing, critical thinking, articulating, synthesizing and conveying ideas, which enable students to pursue a wide range of careers.

Many students who undertake a Masters in English wish to pursue PhD study or careers in the education sector, media, journalism, publishing, and library and information work.

A Masters in English shows the ability to communicate effectively and to a high standard. The ability to articulate and transmit ideas clearly prepares students to enter careers in advertising, marketing and PR.

Our Career Development Centre has just been shortlisted for the Best University Careers Service in the National Undergraduate Employability Awards for 2017.

With a growing network of over 3,000 employers around the world and a team of experienced careers consultants, we are here to help you succeed.

In 2015–16, we helped over 1,500 students find work placements across a range of sectors, with 250 employers attending 14 on-campus skills and careers fairs.

As a Westminster student, you’ll have access to our services throughout your studies and after you graduate.

We can help you:

  • find work placements related to your course
  • find part-time/vacation, placement and graduate jobs, including voluntary experience
  • find international opportunities to enhance your employability
  • market yourself effectively to employers
  • write better CVs and application forms
  • develop your interview and enterprise skills
  • plan your career with our careers consultants
  • meet employers and explore your career options at our employer fairs, careers presentations and networking events throughout the year

Find out more about the Career Development Centre.

Find out more

15% discount for teachers

If you are currently teaching in a UK secondary school or further education college, you may be entitled to a 15% discount on this MA course.

Find out more

English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies webinar

Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies

Fees and Funding

UK and EU tuition fee: £2,750 (price per academic year)

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

As well as tuition fee loans, there is a range of funding available to help you fund your studies.

Find out about postgraduate student funding options.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

International tuition fee: £6,250 (price per academic year)

Find out how we set our tuition fees.

Alumni discount

This course is eligible for an alumni discount. Find out if you are eligible and how to apply by visiting our Alumni discounts page.

Funding

Find out about funding for international students.

Scholarships

The University is dedicated to supporting ambitious and outstanding students and we offer a variety of scholarships to eligible undergraduate students, which cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Find out if you qualify for one of our scholarships.

Additional costs

See what you may need to pay for separately and what your tuition fees cover.

Course Location

Our Regent Campus is composed of three sites all situated on and around one of the most famous and vibrant streets in London. The Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities is based at 309 Regent Street and includes recently refurbished social spaces and gym facilities. Students in the faculty are also taught at our Wells Street site. Westminster Law School resides at Little Titchfield Street. Alongside a full mock courtroom, hi-tech learning spaces and a pro-bono clinic, it also houses our state-of-the-art, 382-seat lecture theatre. For more details, visit our locations page.

More information

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