Part-time students

Why study at the University of Westminster?

As one of the largest universities in the country, the University offers students an exceptional range of subjects and has an outstanding track record in part-time education. Over half of our 22,000 students are studying part-time, and you will find libraries, computing facilities, refectories and bars open into the evening and at weekends.

What can you study?

In addition to many full-time programmes, the University offers a variety of options which allow you to study at the level and pace that suits your requirements and needs.

Part-time options are available for all the different types and levels of course at the University, from undergraduate degrees and Masters programmes to foundation and short courses, including a part-time Modern Language Evening Programme and a summer school that runs English as a Foreign Language (EFL) courses.

In many subject areas, postgraduate modules are also available as top-up short courses or, in some cases, in intensive block mode* or by distance learning

* Some courses are offered in short, intensive full-time study periods of 1-4 weeks, and this may include weekend as well as weekday study.

Professional accreditation

The University of Westminster provides a range of courses leading to professional accreditation across relevant subject areas at Certificate and Diploma levels (lasting one or two years part-time).

How much will it cost?

The fees for part-time undergraduate and postgraduate study are calculated based on the number of module credits taken each year.

Visit our Student finance page for our undergraduate and postgraduate course fees.

Visit our Part-time funding page for details on possible funding sources for undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

The fees for our professional, short, and summer school courses can be found on the relevant course pages.

How do you apply?

Before you apply, make sure that you fulfil the entry requirements, which are provided on each course page.

You can apply online, via the relevant course page, for any part-time undergraduate, postgraduate, short, or professional course.

Studying part-time for an undergraduate degree

We offer part-time routes in almost every subject area. Some are designed to help you top up an existing qualification or experience with a degree, others are more general in approach and allow for greater personal choice. Most courses start in September, but some allow for students to join in the second semester, which commences in January.

By choosing your course and modules carefully, you can study during the day (often alongside full-time students) or evening, or a mixture of both, at our West End or Harrow campuses.

Administrative offices are open Monday to Friday and our libraries are open into the evenings and at weekends during term time.

Achieving a degree part-time usually takes a minimum of four years on the basis of attending classes two evenings each week of the academic year, with an additional 6-12 hours each week of personal study time. If you have the support of your employer, you may be able to take a degree by day release.

Previous studies and experience are beneficial

Your previous experience, at work and in life generally, can not only qualify you for entry to a course but may also allow you some credit under the modular scheme, shortening your degree studies. For example, if you have worked in business, you may be able to gain credit to exempt you from business or administration modules in your first year. A previous qualification such as an HNC in a related area might also help you shorten the length of your study.

The minimum length of time needed to achieve a degree is still likely to be three years part-time or eighteen months full-time.

EXEMPTION FROM PARTICULAR MODULES

Students of any age can gain exemption from specific modules for previously acquired certificated learning, if it is at an appropriate level, eg Open University modules, BTEC awards or a professional examination. This is known as the Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL).

If you are at least 21, you may be eligible for the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) to gain exemption against specific modules for knowledge and skills which you have gained through life, work experience and study, but which have not been formally measured through any educational or professional certification. This might include editing, writing and reporting, or programming and computer use, or organising a cultural festival, provided you can show that the prior learning is at undergraduate level. You will be required to submit a portfolio of other validated evidence of learning achieved.

Read more about Accreditation of Prior Learning.

Studying part-time for a postgraduate or professional qualification

There are part-time routes in almost every subject area. Most courses start in September, but in some courses it is possible to begin in the second semester, which starts in January. Details of start dates are included on course pages.

By choosing your course and modules carefully, you can study during the day (often alongside full-time students) or evening, or a mixture of both, at our West End or Harrow campuses. In either case, the University has shops, cafes and refectories so that there is usually somewhere to get a snack before starting classes.

As a part-time student, you can make full use of all facilities for sports, social life and study. Relevant administrative offices are open Monday to Friday and our libraries are open into the evenings and at weekends during term time.

Achieving a postgraduate qualification part-time usually takes a minimum of one or two years studying two evenings each week of the academic year, with an additional 6-12 hours each week in personal study time. If you have the support of your employer, you may be able to study by day release.

Speeding up your degree

If your course is related to your previous study or experience (whether in paid work or a voluntary capacity), you may be able to make a case to gain exemptions from some modules by shortening the length of your study through either of two forms of assessment:

  • The Assessment of Prior Certificated Learning (APL): The accreditation of previously acquired certificated learning, such as Open University modules or in-company training.
  • The Assessment of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL): The recognition of knowledge or skills acquired through life, work experience and study, which has not been formally attested through any academic or professional certification. It might include, for example, computer programming, editing skills or organisational skills.

The assessment of eligibility for Accreditation of Prior Learning is made at the time of admission.

Visit us to find out more

You can explore our undergraduate and postgraduate courses in more depth and see our sites and facilities first-hand by coming to one of our open days or information evenings.

Find out when our open days and information evenings take place.