Single Modules in Planning, Housing, Urban Design, Transport and Logistics

LocationMarylebone, Central London
FacultyArchitecture and the Built Environment

We have identified individual modules that are suitable as stand-alone learning packages. You can take just one or several. These modules are credit-bearing, so you can use them to accumulate flexible credit.

Advantages of taking a single module

Taking a single module at Master’s level is a step up from CPD but does not require the same level of commitment as a full degree. This may help you brush up on latest thinking or fill a specific gap in your knowledge.

What is involved

You will study alongside students on one of the Master's programmes. We have selected specific modules on each programme that may appeal to students taking a single module. You will be expected to attend all the sessions and undertake assessments – normally essays or projects. The work will be marked and you will receive a mark and feedback.

Typically, you will attend three hours a week over the 12-week semester, starting in September or January.

Please note: The following module information is indicative only. Single modules are offered subject to available spaces and the listed days and times may change before an offer is made. Please check module availability and scheduling with the named contact before applying. 

Fees

Fees for each 20 credit module for the academic year 2016–17 are as follows:

  • £725 UK/EU participants (£900 for air transport)
  • £1,300 international participants

Entry requirements

You will normally hold a first degree or appropriate equivalent qualification awarded by a recognised institution. Applications from candidates with non-traditional academic backgrounds are encouraged. Applicants from such backgrounds would be expected to have significant work experience at the appropriate level. Mature students are considered favourably. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in each component.

To apply

To apply please complete the single modules application form (PDF), then scan and return it to mrdmark@westminster.ac.uk or send a hard copy to the Admissions Office, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS. Please note the module code (listed below) of the module you wish to study.

Course content

Single modules are available in the following subject areas:

Housing

Contact: Dr Tony Manzi manzit@westminster.ac.uk

Urban Policy and Strategy – 7PLAN026W
Semester 1 Wednesday 2.30–5.30pm
Credits: 20

This module focuses on local and national policy-making within a housing context. Areas covered include policy success and failure, theoretical and practical knowledge to policy-making and implementation, and using contemporary housing and urban policies.

Housing Management Practice – 7HOUS005W
Semester 1 Tuesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

Through this module you will examine the key areas relating to the management of housing organisations – including practical and theoretical issues, neighbourhood renewal and sustainable communities, and equal opportunity policies.

Housing Law – 7HOUS004W
Semester 1 Tuesday 2.30–5.30pm
Credits: 20

This module examines the effectiveness and limitations of the law, critical approaches to tenancy law issues, and the synthesis of issues surrounding modern tenancy law.

Housing and Regeneration – 7HOUS002W
Semester 2 Wednesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

You will examine the contribution of housing agencies to the development process and consider wider changes in the governance of regeneration, within the context of localism and neighbourhood-based approaches. You will consider the role of partnerships and examine the relationship between housing, planning and economic development.

Housing and Public Finance – 7HOUS001W
Semester 2 Wednesday 2.30–5.30pm
Credits: 20

This module covers public finance and housing markets, housing finance policy, and the local authority, housing association, private rented and owner occupation sectors of the housing market. It offers you comparative perspectives on the housing market.

Public Participation and Engaging Communities – 7PLAN014W
Semester 2 Wednesday 9am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module analyses key historical and contemporary debates about participation and community engagement as applied in planning and housing. You will consider the key social science concepts related to community, participation, social capital and governance, and also the legal and procedural powers. The module offers advanced study skills in information selection, referencing, essay planning and critical analysis.

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Urban and regional planning

Contact: Duncan Bowie d.bowie@westminster.ac.uk

Planning Theory and Practice 1 – 7PLAN012W 
Semester 1 Tuesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module will equip you with a critical understanding of the environmental, social and economic forces which influence spatial development and the qualities of place. It will introduce you to key historical and contemporary debates in planning, and the concept of sustainable development. The module explores the current institutional, legislative and policy framework of the spatial planning system, and the role of planning in relation to other stakeholders involved in place shaping and place making.

Planning Theory and Practice 2 – 7PLAN013W 
Semester 2 Tuesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module examines the governance of planning and theoretical ideas about planning, and further explores the social and economic dimensions of sustainable development. You will explore debates about social exclusion, diversity and community engagement in planning. You will also examine how planning operates at different geographic scales, and investigate planning for economic growth, and the provision of housing and social infrastructure.

Sustainable Cities and Neighbourhoods – 7PLAN019W 
Semester 1 Wednesday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

This module explores ‘next generation’ cities, investigating critical issues relating to climate change and other large-scale environmental threats and challenges through a cross-disciplinary perspective, at a range of scales from the global to the local. A critical understanding of the concept of sustainability, encompassing notions of resource conservation, environmental, social and economic impact, quality of life and urban resilience, is essential.

Skills for Planning Practice – 7PLAN018W 
Semester 1 Wednesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 10

This module will provide you with the skills needed to collect, manage, analyse and present data for evidence-based planning practice. It will develop your understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of needs, capacity and impact assessments. The module will also provide an opportunity for you to reflect on the interpersonal skills needed for planning practice and project management including negotiation and community engagement.

Public Participation and Engaging Communities – 7PLAN014W 
Semester 2 Wednesday 9am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module analyses key historical and contemporary debates about participation and community engagement as applied in planning and housing. You will consider the key social science concepts related to community, participation, social capital and governance, and also the legal and procedural powers. The module offers advanced study skills in information selection, referencing, essay planning and critical analysis.

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International planning

Contact: Tony Lloyd Jones lloydjt@westminster.ac.uk

Planning in a Globalising World – 7PLAN011W
Semester 1 Thursday 9am–12 pm
Credits: 20

Explores urban issues such as impacts of economic globalisation and sustainability in a range of development contexts (developed and developing worlds, and high, middle and low-income countries) using a comparative planning systems approach. You will analyse key urban policy concerns, debates, dynamics of urban change and planning responses comparatively and internationally, across different regional and historical contexts.

Sustainable Cities and Neighbourhoods – 7PLAN019W
Semester 1 Wednesday pm
Credits: 20

This module explores ‘next generation’ cities, investigating critical issues relating to climate change and other large-scale environmental threats and challenges through a cross-disciplinary perspective, at a range of scales from the global to the local. A critical understanding of the concept of sustainability, encompassing notions of resource conservation, environmental, social and economic impact, quality of life and urban resilience, is essential.

Skills for Planning Practice – 7PLAN018W
Semester 1 Wednesday am
Credits: 10

This module will provide you with the skills needed to collect, manage, analyse and present data for evidence-based planning practice. It will develop your understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of needs, capacity and impact assessments. The module will also provide an opportunity for you to reflect on the interpersonal skills needed for planning practice and project management including negotiation and community engagement.

Sustainable Neighbourhood Development and Management – 7PLAN020W
Semester 2 Tuesday 10am-1pm
Credits: 20

Addresses the range of social sustainability concerns including housing and livelihoods. As well as introducing you to techniques such as participatory planning and community asset management, this module is concerned with local neighbourhood planning and introducing conceptual frameworks for understanding localised social and governance structures.

International Spatial Planning Practice – 7PLAN006W
Semester 2 Tuesday pm
Credits: 20

Through the exploration of theoretical models of sustainable urban form and practical exercises, you will explore the principles, methods and techniques of land use, transport and infrastructure planning for new and existing towns and cities and their regions. The module examines strategic spatial planning policy and managing development in the context of rapid urbanisation and the challenge of urban governance in the developing world.

Planning for Urban Risk and Resilience – 7PLAN010W
Semester 1 Thursday 2.30–5.30pm
Credits: 20

Explores spatial planning for risk management, including reducing vulnerability and building urban resilience as it relates to the built environment, urban governance and long-term climate change and development needs. The module integrates sustainable development and climate change mitigation and adaptation planning concerns with disaster and hazard risk management in an international urban context.

Housing and Regeneration – 7HOUS002W
Semester 2 Wednesday am
Credits: 20

You will examine the contribution of housing agencies to the development process and consider wider changes in the governance of regeneration, within the context of localism and neighbourhood-based approaches. You will consider the role of partnerships and examine the relationship between housing, planning and economic development.

Public Participation and Engaging Communities – 7PLAN014W
Semester 2 Wednesday am
Credits: 20

This module analyses key historical and contemporary debates about participation and community engagement as applied in planning and housing. You will consider the key social science concepts related to community, participation, social capital and governance, and also the legal and procedural powers. The module offers advanced study skills in information selection, referencing, essay planning and critical analysis.

Public Realm: Significance, Design, Experience – 7PLAN015W
Semester 2 Wednesday am
Credits: 20

This module focuses on the public realm from the perspective of urban design and planning. In the module you will have the opportunity to study and write about key theories and debates about public space. These include issues such as inclusion and exclusion, the ‘publicness’ of public space, identity, experience, movement, green spaces, crime, security and anti-social behaviour and different approaches to management. These are considered in an international context. You will examine practical examples and will undertake a practical project to explore these issues ‘on the ground’ thereby enhancing your skills in critical evaluation and design appreciation.

Traffic and Streets – 7TRAN027W
Semester 2 Wednesday am
Credits: 20

This module focuses on traffic and streets, where traffic refers to a range of urban transport modes. It covers movement and place functions in urban contexts, including tensions within and between each. Students analyse approaches to evaluating urban street environments, particularly focused on walking and cycling. This incorporates comparisons of methodological approaches used within different streetscape contexts and within different countries.

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Urban design

Contact: Bill Erickson w.n.erickson@westminster.ac.uk

Sustainable Cities and Neighbourhoods – 7PLAN019W
Semester 1 Wednesday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

This module explores ‘next generation’ cities, investigating critical issues relating to climate change and other large-scale environmental threats and challenges through a cross-disciplinary perspective, at a range of scales from the global to the local. A critical understanding of the concept of sustainability, encompassing notions of resource conservation, environmental, social and economic impact, quality of life and urban resilience, is essential.

Public Realm: Significance, Design, Experience – 7PLAN015W
Semester 2 Wednesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module focuses on the public realm from the perspective of urban design and planning. In the module you will have the opportunity to study and write about key theories and debates about public space. These include issues such as inclusion and exclusion, the ‘publicness’ of public space, identity, experience, movement, green spaces, crime, security and anti-social behaviour and different approaches to management. These are considered in an international context. You will examine practical examples and will undertake a practical project to explore these issues ‘on the ground’ thereby enhancing your skills in critical evaluation and design appreciation.

Public Participation and Engaging Communities – 7PLAN014W 
Semester 2 Wednesday 9am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module analyses key historical and contemporary debates about participation and community engagement as applied in planning and housing. You will consider the key social science concepts related to community, participation, social capital and governance, and also the legal and procedural powers. The module offers advanced study skills in information selection, referencing, essay planning and critical analysis.

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Air transport

Contact: Dr Nigel Dennis dennisn@westminster.ac.uk
This module is taught in block mode

Air Transport Economics – 7TRAN001W
Semester 1 or 2 block mode
Credits: 20

This module examines the structure of the airline industry and the international regulatory regime within which it operates. You will analyse airline costs and revenues, relating them to financial performance, and examine airport economics along with key concepts in airport operations and planning.

Logistics and supply chain management

Contact: Dr Allan Woodburn a.g.woodburn@westminster.ac.uk

Logistics Management and Planning: The Internal Environment – 7TRAN016W
Semester 1 Wednesday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

This module provides you with the foundation for studying logistics, ensuring that you are aware of the components of the logistics system and how they interact with each other to influence the design and operation of supply chains. You will focus on the aspects of logistics operations that tend to be directly within the control of companies.

Logistics and the External Environment (limited places) – 7TRAN014W
Semester 1 Friday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module is designed to make you aware of the external influences that companies must take into account in the design and operation of their logistics systems. Supply chains do not exist in a vacuum, and there are many issues that companies need to consider to ensure that they operate legally and responsibly in addition to meeting their own internal company objectives.

Retail Supply Chain Management (limited places) – 7TRAN022W
Semester 2 Friday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

You will examine retail markets by country and sector, and investigate developments in control of the supply chain between retailers and manufacturers. You will explore cost structures in the retail supply chain, and new patterns of retailing and their implication for logistics; international comparisons are also made.

Freight Transport and Logistics Services – 7TRAN010W
Semester 2 Wednesday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

This module examines the changing market for freight transport and logistics services in a European and increasingly global context. You will evaluate economic principles in terms of costs and revenues, and assess the changing demands for new services. Fleet operations and warehouse management are investigated in relation to technology and market requirements, and you will also explore strategic options for service providers.

Sustainability and Freight Transport – 7TRAN026W
Semester 1 Wednesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

In this module you will focus on the study of sustainability and green logistics, with a particular emphasis on freight transport. The first part of the module provides the context for sustainable supply chains, and you will examine the business and public policy reasons for attempting to address sustainability issues, and how sustainability impacts are measured, monitored and reported. In the second part of the module you will focus on the freight transport element of supply chain management, looking at the strategic operational and public policy perspectives.

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Transport planning and management

Contact: Dr Enrica Papa e.papa@westminster.ac.uk

Research Dissertation – 7TRAN021W
All year module with scheduled attendance Semester 1 Thursday am
Credits: 60
(note this is a triple module so the fee is 3 x £725 for UK/EU students and 3 x £1,300 for international students)

This is an opportunity to complete a supervised research project of your choice incorporating original analysis, and write it up as a 20,000 word assessed dissertation. Applicants who are not taking other MSc modules must have a strong background in transport research and/or policy; a supportive employer in the sector is also helpful. Lectures are provided on research methods in Semester One, and we also recommend that students also register for the linked Statistics and Survey Methods for Transport module, which runs on Thursday afternoons. Much work on the dissertation would be carried out during Semester 2 with an individual supervisor assigned to advise on progress. The dissertation is then submitted in early September.

Statistics and Survey Methods for Transport - 7TRAN024W
Semester 1 Thursday pm
Credits: 20

This module is designed to equip transport planners and managers with the basic concepts used in statistics and market research methods, and their application in the transport context, illustrated by suitable examples. You will analyse real-life transport datasets, using advanced Excel techniques and specialist software, and learn how to interpret and present your results.

Transport Policy and Politics – 7TRAN030W
Semester 1 Tuesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module introduces you to debates within transport policy and politics past, present and future. It draws on material from different disciplines in placing a range of relevant controversies, ideas and issues within their theoretical, policy and political contexts. You will cover specific levels of decision-making for different topics, and learn about non-governmental organisations, including lobby groups, that influence transport policy making.

Transport Economics – 7TRAN028W
Semester 1 Tuesday 2–5pm

Through this module you will examine the application of relevant economic principles to the transport sector, including fundamental topics of transport economics and new frontiers in the field. Topics you will explore include travel demand, pricing and supply of transport, investment in transport, economic and environmental appraisal of transport, transport markets, and the wider economic impacts of transport.

Land Use, Planning and Transport – 7TRAN013W
Semester 2 Wednesday 10am–1pm

The module focuses on the interaction between transport and land-use, including the effect of land-use on travel patterns and the contribution of transport to development. Topics you will explore include changing planning system impact on transport systems and their sustainability, LUTI modelling and the role of forecasting in relation to transport planning, sustainable accessibility planning, transit oriented development, perspectives on planning major transport infrastructure, and scenario planning.

Public Passenger Transport – 7TRAN017W
Semester 2 Tuesday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

This module will give you an understanding of contemporary issues concerning planning and operation of public passenger transport systems, primarily in the urban context and with reference to rural and long-distance markets. This is interpreted mainly in respect of rail and bus/coach, but also demand-responsive systems, taxis, cycle hire schemes and integration among different public transport modes. You will analyse and critically compare different experiences from the UK, Europe and the rest of the world.

Traffic and Streets – 7TRAN027W
Semester 2 Tuesday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module focuses on traffic and streets, where traffic refers to a range of urban transport modes. It covers movement and place functions in urban contexts, including tensions within and between each. Students analyse approaches to evaluating urban street environments, particularly focused on walking and cycling. This incorporates comparisons of methodological approaches used within different streetscape contexts and within different countries.

Airport Planning and Management – 7TRAN009W
Semester 2 Thursday 10am–1pm
Credits: 20

This module gives you the opportunity to examine the organisation and management of the airport industry. You will assess airport economics and performance, and discuss aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues. You will also examine airport operations and capacity issues, terminal operations and airport marketing, airport expansion issues, and the role of regional airports. Surface access strategies are analysed and planning procedures for expansion are discussed.

Airline Planning and Management – 7TRAN007W
Semester 2 Thursday 2–5pm
Credits: 20

In this module you will examine the international regulatory framework for air transport and the impact of deregulation. You will evaluate economic principles in terms of costs and revenue structures. You will assess airline commercial strategies. You will investigate aircraft operations in relation to both technical and market requirements.

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Contact us

For application queries 

Admissions office
E: mrdmark@westminster.ac.uk

For module content 

Please contact the named academic for the subject area.

Semester dates

Our 2016–17 dates are as follows:

  • Semester 1: teaching 26 September–16 December 2016, final coursework deadline 9 January 2017.
  • Semester 2: teaching 23 January–13 April 2017, final coursework deadline for modules with exams 2 May 2017, for modules without exams 22 May 2017.