Air Traffic Management

LocationMarylebone, Central London
FacultyArchitecture and the Built Environment

This Air Transport short course examines issues in air traffic management, including economic, regulatory and performance aspects. We will discuss current procedures, regulations, policies and data sources, in addition to the latest research and European planning in SESAR. You will also explore the technical aspects of flow management, flight planning and performance measurement.

Who is this course for? 

This course is designed for air transport professionals, such as:

  • middle management at both airlines and airports
  • management from air transport related industries (eg software/solutions development)
  • employees at air navigation service providers
  • employees working in airline scheduling, airport management and operations, and ATM research functions

Academics from research institutes and universities, especially those engaged in air transport research, also will find the course beneficial for their work and research

Courses open for booking
Start date Duration Day and time Price Apply
9 April 2018 2 days Monday to Tuesday, 9.30am–5.30pm £595 (£545 if booked 1 month in advance) Book now

Course content 

During this course you will explore the principles of European air traffic management and airspace use from current practice to advanced future concepts.

Flow management and current flight planning are explained; performance measurement is discussed, with insights into KPIs and the regulatory context.

A discussion of modelling approaches in ATM is complemented by a session on key datasets available to support aviation research.

You will also discuss the latest research methods and challenges ahead, through the application of specific examples. The main operational and technical content of SESAR and its Key Features are explained.

Furthermore, such topics as trajectory-based operations and free routes, the challenges and benefits of increased automation, and the vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies relating to cybersecurity will be covered.

Learning outcomes 

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • evaluate and assess current issues in air traffic management
  • critically appraise current air traffic management and flight planning methods and practices, identifying future challenges, considering planned improvements and new concepts
  • identify key research areas in air traffic management, citing applied examples and new methods

Tutor information

Each session is presented by a senior expert in the field, with a balance between practitioners from industry and leading academic researchers. The course lecturers are:

  • Dr Andrew Cook, Principal Research Fellow, University of Westminster
  • Dr Luis Delgado, Senior Research Fellow, University of Westminster
  • Dr Gérald Gurtner, Senior Research Fellow, University of Westminster
  • Graham Tanner, Senior Research Fellow, University of Westminster
  • Julie Cranch, Head of Strategic Operational Development, NATS
  • Adrian Clark, Manager Advanced Concepts, Future ATM & Policy, NATS

Day 1 (Monday 9 April 2018) (current operations)

Time Title Speaker Learning and delivery objectives
9.15–9.30am Registration    
9.30–9.45am Welcome and introduction to course

Dr Andrew Cook,

Principal Research Fellow, University of Westminster

Understand the scope of the module/course and wider context of SESAR
9.45–10.45am The principles of air traffic flow management

Dr Luis Delgado,

Senior Research Fellow,

University of Westminster

Understand how flow management operates under capacity constraints - compare and contrast US and European approaches
10.45–11.30am The principles of flight planning and ATM messaging

Graham Tanner,

Senior Research Fellow,

University of Westminster

Appreciate the main principles of current flight planning through discussion of: an example flight plan; the route availability document; slots; flight planning tools. Includes an introduction to the Extended Flight Plan (EFPL).
11.30am–12pm Tea/coffee    
12–12.50pm Operating en-route and oceanic airspace - design and challenges

Julie Cranch,

Head of Strategic Operational Development, NATS

Understand the main features of operation of the London Flight Information Region and other domestic en-route airspace and the main principles of operating oceanic airspace; compare and contrast them; understand future plans to converge these two environments
12.50–2.30pm Lunch, Sherlock Holmes hotel    
2.30–3.20pm ATC at Heathrow: the world’s busiest dual-runway airport

Adrian Clark,

Manager Advanced Concepts, Future ATM & Policy, NATS

Understand the main principles of operating a dual runway, segregated mode, airport; stack system, cross-border operations, and the link to airspace design; gain knowledge of future expansion challenges
3.20–3.10pm Performance measurement in ATM Dr Andrew Cook Appreciate key aspects of performance measurement in ATM with comparisons across the main regions: US-Europe-China; gain knowledge of latest regulatory and KPI context
4.10–4.40pm Tea/coffee    
4.40–5.30pm SESAR - a high-level content view of the programme

David Bowen,

Chief ATM, SESAR Joint Undertaking

Attain familiarity with the main operational and technical content of SESAR and its Key Features through a high-level content overview

 

Day 2 (Tuesday 10 April 2018) (future concept and research)

Time Title Speaker Learning and delivery objectives
9.30–10.15am Future concepts in ATM Dr Luis Delgado Attain familiarity of the core challenges of future ATM, understanding links with performance measurement, with further insights into trajectory-based operations and free routes.
10.15–11am The challenges and benefits of increased automation in ATM

Prof Francisco Javier Saez Nieto, University of Cranfield

& SESAR Scientific Committee

Understand how automation will contribute to ATM, reducing workload and human errors; identify key challenges such as human capability and recovery from degraded modes of operation, plus preventing skill decay
11–11.30am Tea/coffee

 

 
11.30am–12.15pm Modelling methods in aviation - comparative benefits

Dr Gérald Gurtner,

Senior Research Fellow,

University of Westminster

Understand why modelling is necessary, appreciating the main methods and pros and cons of each - with an overview of the challenges of linking causal (e.g. agent-based) and correlation (e.g. Bayesian, neural network) models.
12.15pm–1pm Digitalising ATM: the cybersecurity challenge

Matt Shreeve,

Principal Consultant, Helios

Be able to define the concept of cybersecurity and identify its key characteristics; discuss typical types of threat and vulnerability in ATM and the stakeholders potentially impacted; identify drivers of increased risk, potential mitigation strategies and associated implementation challenges
1–2.30pm Lunch, Sherlock Holmes hotel

 

 
2.30–3.15pm Essential data sources in aviation and ATM Graham Tanner Gain familiarity with the key datasets available to support aviation and ATM research, costs and accessibility, pros and cons, synergies
3.15–4pm The SESAR exploratory research (ER) programme in a nutshell

Dr Andrew Cook

Gain familiarity with: the core work carried out across SESAR ER; the main areas of research supporting the Master Plan; links with the industrial programme; funding for calls; main events; role of the Scientific Committee and the Engage KTN
4–4.30pm

Tea/coffee

   
4.30–5.20pm Vista -  insights into a current SESAR exploratory research project Dr Gérald Gurtner Understanding the key objectives and implementation of a current SESAR ER project, outlining the partnerships and project stages, with a summary of the technical content and key results