Connect with me
I'm part of

About me

I am currently the Co-ordinator of the Division of Biochemistry, Pharmacology and Applied Biosciences within the Department of Life Sciences at the University of Westminster. My academic education began in environmental science and microbiology. I undertook my PhD and post-doctoral work at Warwick University in collaboration with the Freshwater Biological Association and Campden Food Preservation Research Association. I subsequently continued my interest in environmental microbiology investigating the role of heterotrophic bacteria in mineral dissolution. I have been a Visiting Researcher at Hiroshima University, Japan, and have collaborated with Ukrainian and Swedish groups on research into aspects of environmental microbiology.

I have been on the Steering Committee of the Water and Soil Biotreatment Club and have sat on various advisory and management groups related to biotechnology and environment. In recent years my research interests have focused on the interaction of environmental law, regulation and policy with science. Specific research themes include water regulation and management based on sound science, setting and monitoring environmental quality standards particularly linked to water, and the regulation of chemical pollutants. The implementation of regulatory standards inevitably benefits from collaboration between regulatory agencies, such as the Environment Agency, that hold large collections of monitoring data, and academics from different disciplines. I received NERC funding to establish a network facilitating knowledge exchange between these actors in order to support the implementation of the Water Framework Directive by local stakeholders. My work in water quality includes consideration of setting and monitoring environmental quality standards for sediments and for novel pollutants such as pharmaceuticals as part of the regulatory framework to protect water. I am also working on the link between science and law in the regulation of chemicals within the EU and internationally. I have employed new technologies such as bioinformatics and molecular modelling to identify impacts of pharmaceuticals on non-target species. I lead Westminster Water Science, a research group within the Faculty of Science and Technology that is specifically designed to foster discussion and debate between disciplines with a common interest in the protection of the aquatic environment.

Teaching

I teach on a number of science and non-science modules and have considerable experience in teaching across disciplines at undergraduate and postgraduate level. I contribute to the development of undergraduate and post-graduate degrees and have led a number of degrees e.g. BSc (Hons) Environmental Science and Business Management and BSc (Hons) Forensic Biology. The modules that I teach at present include the MSc modules Environmental Biotechnology (3BIO7B5) and Communicating Science (3BIO7N4) and the BSc modules Microbial World (FMAB508), Working a Crime Scene (FMAB610), Forensic Evidence in the Courts (FMAB600) and Cell Biology (FSLS401). I am module leader for the two forensic modules. I supervise project students at undergraduate and postgraduate level and I am a personal tutor for undergraduate students. I act as a Professional Tutor for new colleagues taking a PG Cert in Education within the University. I act as a University Chair for Degree Validations and Reviews ensuring the standards of new and existing degrees across all University Faculties. 

Research

Research work

My research interests focuses on the interaction of environmental law, regulation and policy with science. I am particularly interested in water quality and protecting the water environment, and in chemicals in the environment. My work includes consideration of setting environmental quality standards for sediments and for novel pollutants such as pharmaceuticals as part of the regulatory framework to protect water. I am also working on the link between science and law in the regulation of chemicals within the EU and internationally. I have employed new technologies such as bioinformatics and molecular modeling to identify impacts of pharmaceuticals on non-target species. I lead Westminster Water Science, a research group within the Faculty of Science and Technology that is specifically designed to foster discussion and debate between disciplines with a common interest in the protection of the aquatic environment.

Key Skills

My work involves a number of important transferrable skills such as: framing questions; identifying evidence- database searches and non-database sources; selecting and excluding evidence; analysing the evidence; extracting, synthesising and summarising findings; developing conclusions and recommendations. The use of bioinformatics and geographical information systems as tools for predicting environmental impacts of pollutants.

Project Subject Areas

  • environmental use of biosensors (non-experimental)
  • bioremediation (non-experimental)
  • biofilters (non-experimental)
  • environmental quality standards and novel pollutants (non-experimental)

Publications

For details of all my research outputs, visit my WestminsterResearch profile.